News: Creator Q&A - Jessica Pearce, Samuel Hunter Galloway - Waiting on Sound

Creator Q&A - Jessica Pearce, Samuel Hunter Galloway - Waiting on Sound

Creator Q&A - Jessica Pearce, Samuel Hunter Galloway - Waiting on Sound

  • 25/Apr/17

Could you tell us a little bit about your work and how you got into the industry?

(Samuel) I’m not sure if I am in the industry, so far my work has been crowd funded or made on a micro budget and had alternative methods of distribution. But that’s the great thing about the current technology, you can make your own industry.

(Jessica) I have been working as a Producer for three years under my production company, Running Panda Films. We have developed a variety of content including theatrically released feature film The Legend of Ben Hall as well as internationally recognised and award winning short films including Nathan Loves Ricky Martin, Past the Second Stage and Boy Saviour.

I had been involved in arts since I was very young yet when I entered the work force I ended up in Sales and Management for ten years. After looking to move into something more creative again, I found my skills from Sales and Management transferred quite easily into Production. It then became a bit of fate as things grew so rapidly and progressed quickly into what is now Running Panda Films. It can sound corny but I like to say 'I dip my toe in the water and the river took me'.

Where did you get the idea for Waiting on Sound?

(Samuel) I was a boom operator for a few years when I first started out, it’s a really hard gig but more than that it has a sense of isolation within the crew. Everyone is there for the visuals, art dept, lighting, camera, the director. Then there’s you and the sound recordist trying to capture some audio of that, you’re almost invisible.


How has your project changed since it’s conceptualization?

(Samuel) I originally pictured a single two minute short film, that became our first episode. I wanted to see how economic I could be with time so getting it as short as possible was the goal, but then we had this huge production for a tiny short film. So Jess pitched the idea around and there was interest in developing it into a web series.


Why did you choose to post this project online?

(Jessica) When I read the first script for Waiting on Sound, which eventually become Episode One, I loved the humour of it as well as could see the potential as branded content. After reaching out to networks in the industry, I find that the format of Online content allows for an instantaneous connection with the audience and your market. As we gained further interest, we expanded the series into what it is now.


How has that changed your perspective about traditional distribution?

(Jessica) As a Producer working in feature and short film as well as online content, it is fascinating seeing the evolution of the marketplace in distribution. There are so many avenues to reach your audience that we are not restricted to the traditional distribution models. This means we can really tailor our strategies to what would suit each project and it’s target audience best.

What has been the critic/fan response like for the project?

(Jessica) The response has been largely positive with specific comments on the humour and the production value. We have found that our niche market of film makers have kept the project alive as it definitely resonates with them.


What advice do you have for filmmakers who want to do what you’re doing?

(Samuel) Just make films, try lots of different things. I’m a big fan of Rick and Morty, you should check out Justin Roiland’s previous attempts at getting that show off the ground, as well as dozens of others.

(Jessica ) Don’t ever stop learning. The biggest lesson I have learnt is knowing when to put up your hand up and say 'I don't know'. As well as, learning to step back and oversee the production. When you progress from small projects to larger productions being the person who does it all is not sustainable. It is about finding a team that you trust and understands how you work.


Q&A Wrangler : Monroe Scott